Delta variant of COVID is as contagious as chickenpox or Ebola: CDC



Last week, Dr. Rochelle Wallensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States, recognized that the Delta variant of COVID-19 is one of the most infectious viruses known to date. Now, CDC notes that this coronavirus mutation is as contagious as chickenpox or Ebola, and more than the common cold and smallpox.

An internal CDC filing, obtained by The Washington Post, revealed that This mutation of the new coronavirus spreads as easily as chickenpox, one of the most communicable viruses in the world., or like smallpox, one of the deadliest viruses in history.

The concern of the US health authority reaches the point of recognizing that the delta variant “has changed the war” against COVID-19. The document also notes that the Delta variant acts almost like a different virus, spreading from person to person more quickly than the common cold virus or Ebola.

In addition, it records data from research not yet published that indicates that vaccinated people who contract the Delta variant of COVID have high viral loads, so high that they can easily spread it to others. This level of viral load is similar to that of unvaccinated people affected by this variant.

The document cites the CDC’s fight to persuade the public to get vaccinated as soon as possible and to continue taking precautionary measures, such as the use of masks, social distance and frequent hand washing.

According to the Post’s data, the CDC’s communication challenge is to continue the emphasis on effectiveness of vaccines in preventing the most serious symptoms of illness and death, while recognizing that vaccinated people can transmit the virus and that so-called “breakthrough” or “revolutionary” infections (those that occur among fully vaccinated individuals) may not be so isolated.

The CDC is expected to release these findings Friday.

Meanwhile, pharmaceutical companies continue to explore the advisability of applying a third dose of mRNA vaccines to increase the level of protection of the immune system. Just a few days ago, Pfizer presented data that a third dose of its vaccine produces five times higher antibody levels against the Delta variant in people 18 to 55 years of age, levels that would rise up to 11 times in people 65 to 85 years.




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