How the tobacco industry persecutes your children



When your children go to the corner market or grocery store to buy a snack, they will most likely be bombarded with products and messages specially designed to tempt them to try the cigarette or the vape.1

If you think that these messages They are not aimed at your children, think about it. The tobacco industry knows that nicotine has a powerful addictive effect on the adolescent brain and that when a young person starts smoking at an early age, they are more likely to become addicted, which can predict the frequency of tobacco use. in adulthood2). For years, in-store advertisements and flashy product packaging were a way to attract children. in low income communities Y predominantly Latino and African American (3). But in the last five years, flavored tobacco that is in the vapes has succeeded in turning vaping among middle and high school kids into an epidemic (4), with 96% of high school students in California who vape use flavors5). This is especially alarming now that children are returning to school after a year of distance education..

But Californians are putting up resistance. More than 100 cities across the state have restricted the sale of flavored tobacco in their communities (6) in order to protect our children from a lifelong addiction. These are three ways the tobacco industry is targeting your children and our communities:

1. Latin flavors with an addictive secret

It is no coincidence that flavors like horchata (7) and the dulce de leche8), designed to appeal to kids, are among the 15,000+ flavored vapes for sale according to the latest counting. But these flavors hide a deadly poison: nicotine salts, extremely powerful, easily absorbed and highly addictive (9). Nicotine disrupts the adolescent brain and can affect concentration and learning. May increase anxiety (10), changes in moodeleven) and irritability12). Nicotine addiction happens quickly, especially in teens, and can lead to other types of substance abuse (13).

2. Easier and cheaper to get

Flavored products, such as menthol cigarettes, are disproportionately sold in our neighborhoods (14), and they are also cheaper in areas where a greater number of young people live (fifteen). One study found that the presence of an e-cigarette store located a quarter of a mile from a high school predicts whether those students will try e-cigarettes in their lifetime (16).

3. Dangerous mint

The tobacco industry deliberately promotes menthol cigarettes17) as a “healthier” alternative to menthol-free cigarettes, when in fact they are just as harmful. Internal documents from tobacco companies reveal that menthol cigarettes are specifically marketed to appeal to younger smokers due to the cooling effect that makes them easier to smoke (18).

itss tactics he hasn It worked: it is no coincidence that more than half of young smokers between the ages of 18 and 24 start to smoke menthol cigarettes (19).

Tobacco companies continue to find loopholes that allow them to sell their poison in our neighborhoods. But more and more communities are taking action to end flavored tobacco once and for all.

In AddictionAlSabor.org you can find out about cHow to dispose of products from flavored tobacco in your community. For information in English visita FlavorsHookKids.org. The enemy is powerful but together we can defeat him.

References

1. Marynak K, Gentzke A, Wang TW, Neff L, King BA. “Exposure to Electronic Cigarette Advertising Among Middle and High School Students” -United States, 2014 –2016, Exposure to Electronic Cigarette Advertising Among Middle and High School Students United States, 2014–2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2018; 67: 294-299. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6710a3

2. Yuan M, Cross SJ, Loughlin SE, Leslie FM. “Nicotine and the adolescent brain”. Nicotine and the adolescent brain. J Physiol. 2015; 593 (16): 3397–3412. doi: 10.1113 / JP270492 (in English)

3. Mills SD, Henriksen L, Golden SD, et al. “Disparities in the Retail Market for Menthol Cigarettes in the United States.” Disparities in retail marketing for menthol cigarettes in the United States, 2015. Health Place. (in English) 2015. Health Place. 2018; 53: 62-70. doi: 10.1016 / j.healthplace.2018.06.011

Four. Cullen KA, Gentzke AS, Sawdey MD, et al. “E-Cigarette Use Among Young People in the United States”, 2019 [publicado en línea antes de su impresión, noviembre de 2019]”, E-Cigarette Use Among Youth in the United States, 2019 [published online ahead of print, 2019 Nov] (in English). JAMA. 2019; 322 (21): 2095-2103. doi: 10.1001 / jama.2019.18387

5. Zhu SH, Braden K, Zhuang YL, Braden K, Gamst A, Cole AG, Wolfson T, Li S. (2021). “Results of the Statewide California Student Tobacco Survey 2019-20,” Results of the Statewide 2019-20 California Student Tobacco Survey. San Diego, California: Center for Research and Intervention in Tobacco Control (CRITC), University of California San Diego.

6. California Department of Public Health, California Tobacco Control Program. “California Locations with Flavored Tobacco Policies Effective May 18, 2021”, Locations of Flavored Tobacco Policies in California as of May 18, 2021 (PDF) https://43xomh2apgzav5gh32k8zb4j-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/Flavored-Tobacco-Bans-and-Menthol-Exemptions-List_5.18.2021.pdf Accessed July 27, 2021.

7. https://vaperanger.com/collections/top-10-horchata

8. https://vaperanger.com/collections/ejuice-dulce-de-leche-flavor

9. Kirkham C. “Juul ignored initial evidence that he was hooking teens,” Juul disregarded early evidence it was hooking teens. Reuters. https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/juul-ecigarette/. Published on November 5, 2019. Accessed on February 4, 2020.

10. Johnson JG, Cohen P, Pine DS, Klein DF, Kasen S, Brook JS. “Association Between Cigarette Smoking and Anxiety Disorders During Adolescence and Early Adulthood,” Association Between Cigarette Smoking and Anxiety Disorders During Adolescence and Early Adulthood. JAMA. 2000; 284 (18): 2348-2351. doi: 10.1001 / jama.284.18.2348

eleven. Etter JF, Ussher M, Hughes JR. “A Test of Suggested New Symptoms of Tobacco Withdrawal”, A Test of Proposed New Tobacco Withdrawal Symptoms (abstract in English). Addiction. 2012; 108 (1): 50-59. doi: 10.1111 / j.1360-0443.2012.03981.x

12. Hughes JR. “Effects of tobacco withdrawal: Valid symptoms and time course”, Effects of abstinence from tobacco: Valid symptoms and time course. Nicotine Tob Res. 2007; 9 (3): 315-327. doi: 10.1080 / 14622200701188919

13. Office of the US Surgeon General. “Know the Risks”, Know the Risks. E-cigarettes.surgeongeneral.gov. Retrieved March 11, 2019.

14. UCSF Smoking Cessation Leadership Center. “Achieving Health Equity in Tobacco Control”, Achieving Health Equity in Tobacco Control (PDF in English). San Francisco, CA: UCSF Smoking Cessation Leadership Center; 2015.

fifteen. UCSF Smoking Cessation Leadership Center. “Achieving Health Equity in Tobacco Control”, Achieving Health Equity in Tobacco Control (PDF in English). San Francisco, CA: UCSF Smoking Cessation Leadership Center; 2015.

16. Yawn G, Crespi CM, Vorapharuek P, McCarthy WJ. “Use of electronic cigarettes among students and presence of specialized electronic cigarette stores near schools”, E-cigarette use among students and e-cigarette specialty retailer presence near schools (abstract in English). Health Place. 2016; 42: 129-136. doi: 10.1016 / j.healthplace.2016.09.012

17. Anderson SJ. “Marketing of menthol cigarettes and consumer perception: a review of tobacco industry documents.” Marketing of menthol cigarettes and consumer perceptions: a review of tobacco industry documents. (in English)Tob Control 2011; 20 Suppl 2 (Suppl_2): ii20-ii28. doi: 10.1136 / tc.2010.041939

18. Anderson SJ. “Marketing of menthol cigarettes and consumer perception: a review of tobacco industry documents.” Marketing of menthol cigarettes and consumer perceptions: a review of tobacco industry documents. Tob Control 2011; 20 Suppl 2 (Suppl_2): ii20-ii28. doi: 10.1136 / tc.2010.041939

19. D’Silva J, Cohn AM, Johnson AL, Villanti AC. “Subjective Differences in Experiences with the First Consumption of Cigarettes with and without Menthol in a National Sample of Young Adult Smokers”. Differences in Subjective Experiences to First Use of Menthol and Nonmenthol Cigarettes in a National Sample of Young Adult Cigarette Smokers. Nicotine Tob Res. 2018 Aug 14; 20 (9): 1062-1068. doi: 10.1093 / ntr / ntx181. PMID: 29059351; PMCID: PMC6093322.



Source link