Relatives of the victims of the massacre in Uvalde react to the video of the slow police response

The Uvalde, Texas, City Council accepted the resignation of Pedro Pete Arredondo as councilman Tuesday night, amid criticism of the police chief for his delay in apprehending the Robb Elementary School killer.

Also released Tuesday was new security footage obtained by the Austin Statesman newspaper detailing the brutality of the massacre that killed 19 children and two teachers last month.

The publication of the videos from the school’s security cameras has been the subject of public discussion in recent weeks. While some politicians have argued that full disclosure to the public is necessary for the truth to be known, relatives of the victims reacted indignantly to the partial leak of the material on Tuesday.

“We weren’t ready to see it” said the father of one of the victims, who regretted that they were not allowed to see him in private before.

The video, that can hurt the susceptibility of the publicshows the stages of the massacre and is composed of several recordings edited by the Austin Statesman and station KVUE, taken from a security camera outside the school, a camera in the hallway, an officer’s body camera, recordings from a telephone cell phone and a 911 call.

The first thing it reveals are the moments before the attacker entered the school, just when he had just crashed his vehicle and fired in the immediate vicinity of the place. He then shows him stopping in one of the school’s hallways, running his hands through his hair before entering rooms 111 and 112.

Seconds later, a boy leans out of the hallway the attacker just passed and runs to the sounds of his semi-automatic rifle firing.

The cited media edited the video to remove the sound of children screaming in the room as the killer unloads his gun. The bursts he fires are heard intermittently for several minutes.

About three minutes after the attacker entered the school, the first three officers are seen running down the hallway to try to reach the classrooms under attack. At that moment, a volley of gunshots is heard and the officers scramble for cover behind the hallway.

The minutes pass and the camera in the school corridor shows the agents going from one side to the other, looking at plans of the school and talking on their radios, but you can’t see them trying to enter the room.

19 minutes after the attacker’s entry, the first ballistic shield arrives in the school corridor. According to Arredondo, this was one of the pieces of equipment that the agents were waiting for in order to move more safely down the corridor to the room where the children and the murderer were. However, it took almost an hour for the agents to neutralize the threat.

outrage reactions

Arredondo has been harshly criticized for delaying the agents’ response. It took 77 minutes to intervene to bring down the attacker, since he entered the school (although his grandmother had already reported him half an hour earlier for shooting him in the face and there were other reports of shots being fired near the school).

Arredondo was suspended from his post on June 22 and resigned as a city councilman last week following criticism.

Among his justifications is the alleged lack of weapons to confront the attacker and a key to open the classroom.

However, both justifications were denied by the director of the Texas Department of Public Safety, Steve McGraw, who pointed out that the agents had a ballistic shield from minute 19 and had enough weapons and personnel to confront the attacker three minutes after who entered school. He also said that they did not try to open the classroom, that It was never locked.

The video published by the Austin Statesman on Tuesday seems to reinforce McGraw’s conclusions, as it shows dozens of heavily armed officers waiting for more than an hour in the corridor, without confronting the assailant.

They even waited after the last shots were heard in the classroom, 45 minutes after the killer entered the school.

McGraw has insisted that officers confront the killer immediately, even if it meant they had to put their own lives in danger.

Calls to the 911 emergency phone between 12:03 and 12:43 from some of the people who were in the classrooms reveal that the officers knew that there were people alive, including that a girl urged them to enter to save them.

At 12:50 pm, 77 minutes after the killer entered, a group of officers waiting outside the room finally enters and several shots are heard, at which point the video compiled by the Austin Statesman and KVUE ends.

According to authorities, a Border Patrol agent killed the shooter. He had arrived around 12:15 with a heavily armed Department of Homeland Security special tactics group.

State investigators are still trying to determine from forensic analysis how many victims died in the minutes police waited to act.

A debate about the publication of the video

For several weeks now, the Uvalde community and the public and politicians in Texas have discussed the wisdom of releasing the 77-minute Robb School security camera footage to the public.

CRIME AND VIOLENCE
“Who has confidence?”: relatives react to the video of the slow police response to the shooting in Uvalde
The City Council accepts the resignation of Pete Arredondo as councilman, amid criticism of the local police chief for his delay in arresting the murderer. Videos show new details of brutal elementary school massacre.

TAP TO UNMUTE
Jul. 12, 2022, 3:48 PM PDT
The Uvalde, Texas, City Council accepted the resignation of Pedro Pete Arredondo as councilman Tuesday night, amid criticism of the police chief for his delay in apprehending the Robb Elementary School killer.

Also released Tuesday was new security footage obtained by the Austin Statesman newspaper detailing the brutality of the massacre that killed 19 children and two teachers last month.

The publication of the videos from the school’s security cameras has been the subject of public discussion in recent weeks. While some politicians have argued that full disclosure to the public is necessary for the truth to be known, relatives of the victims reacted indignantly to the partial leak of the material on Tuesday.

“We were not ready to see it,” said the father of one of the victims, who regretted that they were not allowed to see it in private before.

The van used by the Uvalde, Texas, killer to get to Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022.
The van used by the Uvalde, Texas, killer to get to Robb Elementary School, on May 24, 2022. Reuters
The video, which may offend the public, shows the stages of the massacre and is made up of several recordings edited by the Austin Statesman and station KVUE, taken from a security camera outside the school, a camera in the hallway, the an officer’s body camera, cell phone recordings and a 911 call.

The first thing it reveals are the moments before the attacker entered the school, just when he had just crashed his vehicle and fired in the immediate vicinity of the place. He then shows him stopping in one of the school’s hallways, running his hands through his hair before entering rooms 111 and 112.

Seconds later, a boy leans out of the hallway the attacker just passed and runs to the sounds of his semi-automatic rifle firing.

[El alcalde de Uvalde niega que un policía tuviera a tiro al autor del tiroteo]

The cited media edited the video to remove the sound of children screaming in the room as the killer unloads his gun. The bursts he fires are heard intermittently for several minutes.

About three minutes after the attacker entered the school, the first three officers are seen running down the hallway to try to reach the classrooms under attack. At that moment, a volley of gunfire is heard and the officers scramble for cover behind the hallway.

Minutes tick by and the school hallway camera shows officers pacing back and forth, looking at blueprints of the school and talking on their radios, but they are not seen trying to enter the room.

19 minutes after the attacker’s entry, the first ballistic shield arrives in the school corridor. According to Arredondo, this was one of the pieces of equipment that the agents were waiting for in order to move more safely down the corridor to the room where the children and the murderer were. However, it took almost an hour for the agents to neutralize the threat.

Images captured by security cameras show the protective equipment and weapons that Uvalde police had when the shooting began at the elementary school.
Images captured by security cameras show the protective equipment and weapons that Uvalde police had when the shooting began at the elementary school.Austin American-Statesman Journal
outraged reactions
Arredondo has been harshly criticized for delaying the agents’ response. It took 77 minutes to intervene to take down the attacker, since he entered the school (although his grandmother had already reported him half an hour before for shooting him in the face and there were other reports of shots being fired near the school).

Arredondo was suspended from his post on June 22 and resigned as a city councilman last week following criticism.

Among his justifications is the alleged lack of weapons to confront the attacker and a key to open the classroom.

[La cronología de la masacre en la escuela primaria de Uvalde minuto a minuto refleja la lenta respuesta de la policía]

However, both justifications were denied by the director of the Texas Department of Public Safety, Steve McGraw, who pointed out that the agents had a ballistic shield from minute 19 and had enough weapons and personnel to confront the attacker three minutes after who entered school. He also said that they did not try to open the classroom, which was never locked.

The video published by the Austin Statesman on Tuesday seems to reinforce McGraw’s conclusions, as it shows dozens of heavily armed officers waiting for more than an hour in the corridor, without confronting the assailant.

They even waited after the last shots were heard in the classroom, 45 minutes after the killer entered the school.

McGraw has insisted that officers confront the killer immediately, even if it meant putting their own lives in danger.

Calls to the 911 emergency phone between 12:03 and 12:43 from some of the people who were in the classrooms reveal that the officers knew that there were people alive, including that a girl urged them to enter to save them.

Agents enter the classroom and kill the killer at Uvalde Elementary School on May 24, 2022.
Agents enter the classroom and kill the killer at Uvalde Elementary School on May 24, 2022. Austin Statesman
At 12:50 pm, 77 minutes after the killer entered, a group of officers waiting outside the room finally enters and several shots are heard, at which point the video compiled by the Austin Statesman and KVUE ends.

According to authorities, a Border Patrol agent killed the shooter. He had arrived around 12:15 with a heavily armed Department of Homeland Security special tactics group.

State investigators are still trying to determine from forensic analysis how many victims died in the minutes police waited to act.

A debate about the publication of the video
For several weeks now, the Uvalde community and the public and politicians in Texas have discussed the wisdom of releasing the 77-minute Robb School security camera footage to the public.

[“Les ruego que hagan algo”: la hermana de una de las niñas asesinadas en Uvalde exige seguridad en las escuelas]

The governor, Greg Abbott, was one of the influential figures who asked that all the material be made public so that everyone could make their own idea about the response of local authorities.

However, the publication of a fragment of this material, edited by the aforementioned media to exclude some graphic details, has caused mixed reactions among parents of the victims and members of the community.

“I watched the clip that they posted on Tuesday and it’s heartbreaking, because we relive this every day and now we’re going to hear it, not just relive it,” said the father of one of the victims. “Everything that happened after his leak is devastating for us. We are tired of seeing things after media all the time. Nobody tells us anything, it is disrespectful to us and our children, ”he added.

“We weren’t ready to see it” another parent added in the same joint statement from Washington DC on Tuesday.

Both parents traveled to the capital to attend an anti-assault rifle rally being held by the March Fourth organization on Wednesday.

In contrast, Republican Rep. Dustin Burrows welcomed the release of an excerpt from the security video, but added that he believed it was “important that the full segment of the response or lack of response from local law enforcement officers be seen.”

In another tweet, Burrows lamented that the victims’ wishes that they be allowed to watch the video first and that some images and sounds of violence were not respected had not been respected.

Jesús Riso, uncle of a girl who died a few days after having made her first communion, stated that he had lost trust with the local police and that it would be better to “start [de nuevo] with someone else.”

“There are no words to adequately express the pain of our community. The recording is heartbreaking and we are deeply upset that families and loved ones did not have the opportunity to view it in private before it was made public,” said Anne Marie Espinoza, Director of Communications for the Uvalde School District.

Source-laopinion.com