the average price that each county has


Vehicle prices are now through the roof, but you might be able to get a deal when you buy in another state, according to data in a recent report. Auto research site iSeeCars analyzed used car prices in the United States and found that, in some states, the average price was significantly higher than others. In this article, I’ll look at the average price of a used car from all 50 states. iSeeCars examined 8 million car sales from February through July 2021. The national average: $ 24,710.

Here the average price of these cars for each state

A used car on the road
Shutterstock
  • Alaska – $ 29,656
  • Wyoming – $ 29,419
  • Montana – $ 27,303
  • Arkansas – $ 27,123
  • Idaho – $ 26,662
  • Texas – $ 26,620
  • New Mexico – $ 26,261
  • Mississippi – $ 25,788
  • New York – $ 25,693
  • California – $ 25,555
  • Florida – $ 25,478
  • Nevada – $ 25,317
  • Georgia – $ 25,299
  • West Virginia – $ 25,260
  • North Dakota – $ 25,259
  • South Dakota – $ 25,156
  • Oklahoma – $ 25,128
  • Louisiana – $ 24,979
  • North Carolina – $ 24,976
  • Rhode Island – $ 24,962
  • Utah – $ 24,842
  • Colorado – $ 24,684
  • Oregon – $ 24,649
  • Maine – $ 24,576
  • Alabama – $ 24,534
  • Arizona – $ 24,520
  • Massachusetts – $ 24,491
  • Illinois – $ 24,421
  • Washington – $ 24,398
  • South Carolina – $ 24,390
  • Kansas – $ 24,357
  • New Jersey – $ 24,329
  • Wisconsin – $ 24,315
  • Tennessee – $ 24,273
  • Missouri – $ 24,142
  • New Hampshire – $ 24,104
  • Vermont – $ 24,033
  • Maryland – $ 23,934
  • Nebraska – $ 23,725
  • Pennsylvania – $ 23,488
  • Delaware – $ 23,469
  • Michigan – $ 23,348
  • Hawaii – $ 23,290
  • Minnesota – $ 23,120
  • Iowa – $ 23,062
  • Kentucky – $ 22,995
  • Virginia – $ 22,618
  • Connecticut – $ 22,528
  • Ohio – $ 22,244
  • Indiana – $ 21,961

Read the full iSeeCars report for more information.

Because of today’s market, it’s understandable if you have questions about buying a car, used or not, right now. But Clark recommends that you hit the brakes when it comes to buying a car while you can. “I know it’s an ugly market right now,” says Clark. “The ugly will go away, and supply and demand will return to equilibrium.”





Source-mundohispanico.com